web analytics
+234 809 053 5932
admin@eduregard.com
23 Apr 2017

The Greatest Struggles Of An Admission Seeker


CLICK THE IMAGE ABOVE TO DOWNLOAD JAMB UTME 2018 PRACTICE SOFTWARE


Based on the educational, societal and economic structures of our dear country, it is considered imperative for all and sundry to acquire tertiary education. Despite the fact that there are virtually no jobs for the millions of graduates out there, millions still go through the process of seeking admission every year.

Basically, the process of seeking admission is fairly straightforward, but then, it is also quite complicated, especially when you consider the fact that everything in this country is based on so-called “connections”. This generates a lot of struggles for admission seekers, struggles that cut across admission seekers all over the country. A person seeking admission in Kaduna will probably admit to facing the same problems as one seeking admission in Enugu. I’ll outline some of these struggles below.

First off, there is the problem of knowing exactly what course you want to do and where you want to do it. There simply is not enough information out there. A lot of people conclude on what to do only to find out they don’t know where best to do it. Some simply don’t know what course to do. Some don’t even know what courses are available for them based on the line they chose in secondary school. Met a girl at a UTME registration center the other day. She did commercial subjects in secondary school and she filled in Law for the course she wanted to do. It was disheartening.

The examination body dumbly makes it worse by giving out the brochure after the registration for the exam. ‘What is the point of the brochure when I’ve already registered?’. This is a sentiment I’ve heard expressed by several candidates for the exam and it’s so right. So admission seekers find usually find themselves in a conundrum when it comes to what to do and where best to do it.

Next up is the preparation for the exam. For candidates still in secondary school, they take it in stride with their school work, but they’ll all admit they are beyond eager to get it out of the way. For second- timers, third-timers and so on, however, it is one hell of a struggle. Speaking from personal experience. The simple fact that you are no longer in an environment where book-learning is an integral part of your day takes a huge toll on your will to study for the exam. To open page after page of books you have believed you no longer have need of is a herculean task. Your mind has moved on from the regimen of constant studying and is now in a sort of an educational limbo. You just have to struggle to put anything inside. And for the uniformed candidates I.e the secondary school students, combining the preparation for the exam( which has a separate syllabus) with their school work and generally, their preparation for their O’level exams is especially stressful. Combined with the fact that most of them, especially those from average or less than average families, have to do one sort of work or the other when they get home from school and so, therefore, have virtually no relaxation time, it is close to pure torture.

And for the uniformed candidates I.e the secondary school students, combining the preparation for the exam( which has a separate syllabus) with their school work and generally, their preparation for their O’level exams is especially stressful. Combined with the fact that most of them, especially those from average or less than average families, have to do one sort of work or the other when they get home from school and so, therefore, have virtually no relaxation time, it is close to pure torture.

Next on the list is fear. Fear, pure, simple fear. Fear of failure, fear of not getting up to what’s required, fear of not being admitted even if you pass. Breaking it down, it is actually just plain

examination fever. It is however magnified due to the fact that the result of this particular exam has a relatively life-impacting effect. Trust me staying at home for a whole year will impact your life. So this fear pervades the mind of admission seekers all over. It’s acuter in the mind of the first-timers but it is more serious for the second-timers, third-timers and so on because they have more to lose relatively. The longer you remain without gaining admission, the less your chances.

Coming up after that, is the anticipation, the expectation, the relief mingled with worry, relief at passing the exam, rumours worry over whether you passed enough, and most often, the mad scramble to call in favors, grovel  where needed and twist arms where needed(for those with the muscle). It is here that you need whatever connections you have, you test “how long your leg is”. So you go through the stress of going from this office to that office, carrying file from mummy’s friend to daddy’s coworker, going to see church pastor and explaining your situation to mosque Imam. And then the stress of waiting. ” OAU no go release list?”, “I hear say FUTA list don come out o”, “dem say na only one list UI go release”. Hundrrumorsfloating around and you struggle to find the one relevant to you.

And then the stress of waiting. ” OAU no go release list?”, “I hear say FUTA list don come out o”, “dem say na only one list UI go release”. Hundrrumorsfloating around and you struggle to find the one relevant to you. Its grueling, to say the least. You wait, uncomfortable and full of nerves, silently grooming your mind for a repeat performance if the apple does not fall your way. “You pray like say na you kill Jesus”. It ain’t an easy life.

Last up, is the struggle, the stress, the confusion of registration after you have been given admission. Though this comes off as a joyful struggle because the weight that has been sitting on your shoulders is now lifted, it is a struggle nonetheless. From bank to cybercafé, from department to faculty, from hostel to Student Affairs, it is not an easy task.

All in all, it is a tough world out here for those seeking admission into tertiary institutions and if you are looking to join the stream, you have to be prepared, seriously prepared.

To all those currently seeking admission into tertiary institutions, I wish you the very best of luck. Or as my OAU niggas will say “All the best o”.


Leave a Reply